Let me be ME

Archive for July, 2020

Mindfulness through Art

In this fast-paced world, we lose our cool if the wi-fi is slow. Children hit the panic button if the smartphone screen hangs. Our patience level has gone for a toss, and all of us are aiming quick results.

How to control heightened emotions?

How to manage anxiety?

How to keep uncertainty and fear at bay?

One most crucial practice is Mindfulness.

But, the question yet again that arises is, HOW?

Everyone is not equipped to practice Mindfulness with efficiency and tends to drift our thoughts. It takes several years and many more years of discipline to attain a peaceful state of mind.

Out of several options available, learning art, of any form, helps a lot in calming down an agitated mind.

In my recent workshop on Mandala art, one of the participants asked me that why I insisted on not using the easer? My reply was simple, “concentrate, be patient and make every stroke with absolute precision, and then there will be no scope of using an eraser.”

The goal of art therapy is to utilize the creative process to help people explore self-expression and, in doing so, find new ways to gain personal insight and develop new coping skills.

(Source-https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-art-therapy-2795755#:~:text=Art%20therapy%20is%20a%20technique,and%20work%20on%20social%20skills.)

My analogy and experience regarding the use of art for personal growth is,

When we draw patterns on paper, we are drawing patterns in our minds. The hand-eye coordination helps the brain to stabilize and avoid any diverting thought, thereby increasing concentration. 

Trick: Do not aim for perfection; draw. If you are seeking perfection, then you’ve already lost the joy of the process.

When we avoid the eraser, we are telling our minds not to haste but be very slow and complete the work with precision. It helps in building up patience.

Trick: Use lighter strokes if you are new to the art form so that when you go wrong, you can erase and draw again without leaving a mark. The same applies to life, as well. Be gentle in your process, and try not to leave marks that are difficult to erase.

When we fill the patterns either with designs or colors, we are not leaving any blank space. We are trying to make the pattern look beautiful, helping in limiting ourselves within the boundaries so that the final product doesn’t look messy.

Trick: Stroke in one direction so that the filled colors look uniform. In a way, we are telling our minds to fill the knowledge that is age-appropriate so that it manifests into something outstanding.

So, next time when you sit for an art session either on your own or with your children, then ensure you keep these little pointers in mind. Your experience will be way different and meaningful.

Participants in the workshop. (My father also joined!)

Epiphany#1

The other day a piece of news popped up in TimeHop (an app that shows nostalgic pics/videos). The story was about Sid’s climb to the ThotongLa Pass. It was back in 2018 when we completed the summit. Read a detailed blog here https://momthyname.blog/2018/06/13/annapurna-circuit-5th-19th-march-2018-hiking-with-sid-to-thorong-la-pass5417mts/ Sid was 12- years old and slightly shorter to me in height.

Sid in “My Powai” magazine

We were climbing towards the base of the summit after an acclimatization day. Sid is a natural climber and runner, and he was so thrilled to be climbing higher that he vanished out of my sight within no time. I was having trouble breathing; hence I was climbing slowly but steadily. When I could not spot him for a long time and the “motherhood-syndrome” activated. I was anxious. I kept asking each passer-by(although there were very few) about Sid, mentioning his looks and clothes he was wearing.
Finally, after a long walk, someone told me that he had seen a boy with a similar description upon a rock.

Sid on the way to ThorngLa Pass
Sid merrily balancing between the rocks

I had my stomach churning and suddenly I could feel the bile rising into my mouth. I was fuming in anger now. I speed up my walk and saw Sid balancing himself between two rocks. His palms tightly gripped on one side while feet on the other. He didn’t even bother to acknowledge my presence, nor was he aware that he has committed a “mistake.” As soon as I reached closer to him, he was excited to share his “discovery”. I reluctantly asked him about it. I was still fuming. He went ahead and showed two giant lizards on the rock and told me that he observed them climbing up the cliff.

Sid’s “DISCOVERY”

At that moment, I had no interest in his discovery or observation; I was obvious to make him realize that he has committed a “mistake.”
He could sense my rage but didn’t pay much heed. He said, “mom, I knew you are behind, and I wanted to run ahead. Above all, I know that this is a linear track, so where would I go? You could have worried lesser.”
I wouldn’t say I liked his comment at that moment. But, now, when I sit and think of it, he was correct, and I was getting hyper.


Last year a similar episode happened on our hike in Sahaydris too during monsoons.. He climbed up the slippery rain-drenched hills, and I lost my breath out of fear.

Epiphany #1: Don’t pass on your emotions to your children. They will learn and grow with the right exposure and experience.

Children are born explorers. They have their wild imagination. They are a gift of nature, and nature makes them learn the most critical life-lessons that no textbook ever can. They have a curious mind, which sadly gets tamed and influenced by us.

Sid wanted to be on his own; he knew where it was heading, he knew I was behind him and was confident that he would not wander anywhere, but I tried to instill fear in him out of my insecurity.


Let your children wander
for nature will teach them
Let them explore and feel
and you’ll see them turning into a gem

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